Research Note - The Impact of Community Commitment on Participation in Online Communities

@article{Bateman2011ResearchN,
  title={Research Note - The Impact of Community Commitment on Participation in Online Communities},
  author={Patrick J. Bateman and Peter H. Gray and Brian S. Butler},
  journal={Inf. Syst. Res.},
  year={2011},
  volume={22},
  pages={841-854}
}
Online discussion communities have become a widely used medium for interaction, enabling conversations across a broad range of topics and contexts. Their success, however, depends on participants' willingness to invest their time and attention in the absence of formal role and control structures. Why, then, would individuals choose to return repeatedly to a particular community and engage in the various behaviors that are necessary to keep conversation within the community going? Some studies… Expand
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