Rescuing Robert Brown—The Origins of Angio-Ovuly in Seed Cones of Conifers

@article{Tomlinson2012RescuingRB,
  title={Rescuing Robert Brown—The Origins of Angio-Ovuly in Seed Cones of Conifers},
  author={Philip Barry Tomlinson},
  journal={The Botanical Review},
  year={2012},
  volume={78},
  pages={310-334}
}
  • P. Tomlinson
  • Published 13 November 2012
  • Environmental Science
  • The Botanical Review
Robert Brown (1827) recognized the distinction between the two major classes of seed plants on the basis, respectively, of exposed ovules, which receive pollen directly, and enclosed ovules, which do not, at the time of pollination. The two groups, unfortunately, became known as “Gymnosperms” and “Angiosperms”, a distinction not made by Brown. The names are, at best, useful only as identifying labels. As is established here, gymno-ovuly and angio-ovuly would have been better words and should… 
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