Requirements for DNA hairpin formation by RAG1/2

@article{Grundy2007RequirementsFD,
  title={Requirements for DNA hairpin formation by RAG1/2},
  author={Gabrielle J. Grundy and Joanne E. Hesse and Martin Gellert},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},
  year={2007},
  volume={104},
  pages={3078 - 3083}
}
The rearrangement of antigen receptor genes is initiated by double-strand breaks catalyzed by the RAG1/2 complex at the junctions of recombination signal sequences and coding segments. As with some “cut-and-paste” transposases, such as Tn5 and Hermes, a DNA hairpin is formed at one end of the break via a nicked intermediate. By using abasic DNA substrates, we show that different base positions are important for the two steps of cleavage. Removal of one base in the coding flank enhances hairpin… 

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