Repurposing Strategies for Therapeutics

@article{Sleigh2012RepurposingSF,
  title={Repurposing Strategies for Therapeutics},
  author={Sara H. Sleigh and Cheryl L. Barton},
  journal={Pharmaceutical Medicine},
  year={2012},
  volume={24},
  pages={151-159}
}
Drug repurposing refers to the development of existing drugs for new indications. These drugs may have (i) failed to show efficacy in late stage clinical trials, without safety issues; (ii) stalled in development for commercial reasons; (iii) passed the point of patent expiry; or (iv) are being explored in new geographical markets. Over the past 5 years, pressure on the industry caused by the ‘innovation gap’ of rising development costs and stagnant product output have become major reasons for… Expand

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