Reproductive strategy of a woodwasp with no fungal symbionts, Xeris spectrum (Hymenoptera: Siricidae)

@article{Fukuda1997ReproductiveSO,
  title={Reproductive strategy of a woodwasp with no fungal symbionts, Xeris spectrum (Hymenoptera: Siricidae)},
  author={H. Fukuda and N. Hijii},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={1997},
  volume={112},
  pages={551-556}
}
Abstract Experiments were conducted to elucidate the reproductive strategy of the siricid woodwasp, Xeris spectrum, which carries no substantial symbiotic fungi in its body, in a comparison with the life cycles of two fungus-carrying siricid woodwasp species, Sirex nitobei and Urocerus japonicus, by considering ecological traits such as seasonal patterns of occurrence, spatial distribution of emergence on a tree, and oviposition activities. Part of the X. spectrum populations emerged in spring… Expand
Reproduction of a woodwasp, Urocerus japonicus (Hymenoptera: Siricidae) using no maternal symbiotic fungus
TLDR
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Symbionts mediate oviposition behaviour in invasive and native woodwasps
TLDR
Based on the responses of these two Sirex species to the fungal strains and species included in the present study, the invasive S. noctilio would continue its present symbiont associations, whereas the native S. nigricornis would partly use the strain of fungal symbionT putatively introduced with S.NoctilIO. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
The genus, the world species are keyed and a partial reconstructed phylogeny is proposed, and DNA barcoding can accurately distinguish larvae of  Xeris  spp. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
The Sirex woodwasp provides a superb model to illustrate the need for a different approach to develop efficient and sustainable management tools to deal with the growing and global nature of pest invasions in forests and plantations. Expand
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TLDR
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