Reproductive skew and relatedness in social groups of European badgers, Meles meles

@article{Dugdale2008ReproductiveSA,
  title={Reproductive skew and relatedness in social groups of European badgers, Meles meles},
  author={Hannah Louise Dugdale and David W. Macdonald and Lisa C. Pope and Paul J. Johnson and Terry A Burke},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2008},
  volume={17}
}
Reproductive skew is a measure of the proportion of individuals of each sex that breed in a group and is a valuable measure for understanding the evolution and maintenance of sociality. Here, we provide the first quantification of reproductive skew within social groups of European badgers Meles meles, throughout an 18‐year study in a high‐density population. We used 22 microsatellite loci to analyse within‐group relatedness and demonstrated that badger groups contained relatives. The average… 
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