Reproductive seasonality is a poor predictor of receptive synchrony and male reproductive skew among nonhuman primates

@article{Gogarten2012ReproductiveSI,
  title={Reproductive seasonality is a poor predictor of receptive synchrony and male reproductive skew among nonhuman primates},
  author={Jan F Gogarten and Andreas Koenig},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2012},
  volume={67},
  pages={123-134}
}
Among nonhuman primates, male reproductive skew (i.e., the distribution of reproductive success across males) appears to be affected primarily by receptive synchrony and the number of males per group. These factors have been assumed to depend on reproductive seasonality, with strong seasonality increasing receptive synchrony, which in turn reduces the strength of male monopolization associated with more males and lower skew. Here we tested the importance of reproductive seasonality for 26… CONTINUE READING

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