Reproductive physiology, dominance interactions, and division of labour among bumble bee workers

@article{Foster2004ReproductivePD,
  title={Reproductive physiology, dominance interactions, and division of labour among bumble bee workers},
  author={Robin L. Foster and Ameilia Brunskill and David Verdirame and Sean O'Donnell},
  journal={Physiological Entomology},
  year={2004},
  volume={29}
}
Abstract.  Bumble bee workers (Bombus bifarius, Hymenoptera: Apidae) exhibit aggression toward one another after the colony begins producing female reproductive offspring (the competition phase). Workers in competition phase colonies must continue to perform in‐nest tasks, such as nest thermoregulation, and to forage for food, to rear the reproductives to maturity. Therefore, competition phase workers are faced with potentially conflicting pressures to work for their colonies, or to compete for… Expand
Worker dominance and reproduction in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris: when does it pay to bare one's mandibles?
TLDR
It is found that the reintroduction of a queen in a queenless colony not only caused worker ovary regression, but also decreased aggressive interactions between workers, thereby restoring the harmony in the colony. Expand
Aggression, Social Interactions, and Reproduction in Orphaned (Bombus impatiens) Workers: Defining Dominance
TLDR
The results confirm aggression has a role in worker reproduction, but also reveal that behavioural dominance does not equate to reproductive dominance under all conditions. Expand
Dufour's gland secretion, sterility and foraging behavior: correlated behavior traits in bumblebee workers.
TLDR
It is demonstrated that foragers produce larger amounts of esters compared to non-foragers, and that their amounts positively correlate with foraging efforts, which suggest that task performance, potential fecundity, and aggression are interlinked, andthat worker-worker interactions are involved in regulating foraging behavior. Expand
Worker reproductive competition affects division of labor in a primitively social paperwasp (Polistes instabilis)
TLDR
It is concluded that worker reproductive competition may have influenced the evolution of colony organization in social insects and that worker interactions play a strong role in regulating task performance. Expand
Reproductive plasticity in bumblebee workers (Bombus terrestris)—reversion from fertility to sterility under queen influence
TLDR
Egg-laying workers that were introduced into queenless colonies mostly maintained their fertility regardless of colony social phase, which shows that worker transition from cooperative to selfish behavior is reversible depending on the social context. Expand
MECHANISMS OF ORGANIZATION IN SOCIAL INSECTS: THE INFLUENCES OF SPATIAL ALLOCATION, DOMINANCE INTERACTIONS, AND WORKER VARIATION IN BUMBLE BEES
TLDR
It is found that workers are spatially organized inside the nest and they remain at a specific distance from the colony center, and bees that feed larvae tend to remain in the center, whereas foragers are more often found on the periphery when not foraging. Expand
Bumblebee size polymorphism and worker response to queen pheromone
TLDR
Using blind, controlled experiments, it is found that n-pentacosane (C25) does indeed negatively affect worker ovary development and applies to workers from large, mature colonies as well as young colonies. Expand
REPRODUCTIVE CONFLICTS AFFECT LABOR AND IMMUNE DEFENSE IN THE QUEENLESS ANT DIACAMMA SP. “NILGIRI”
TLDR
The costs of conflicts in 20 colonies of the queenless ant Diacamma sp. Expand
Experimental analysis of worker division of labor in bumblebee nest thermoregulation (Bombus huntii, Hymenoptera: Apidae)
TLDR
It is concluded that some B. huntii workers specialize on nest thermoregulation, and that changes in work rates are more important than task switching in meeting thermal challenges. Expand
Reproductive potential and its behavioural consequences in orphaned bumblebee workers (Bombus impatiens)
TLDR
The results challenge the premise that aggression is a means of preventing reproduction by kin: aggression may possibly serve to promote it. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 30 REFERENCES
Individual and colony factors in bumble bee division of labor (Bombus bifarius nearcticus Handl; Hymenoptera, Apidae)
TLDR
It is concluded that rates of performing some tasks were largely determined by changes in colony demography or correlated variables, while rates of performance of other tasks depended more on external environmental conditions. Expand
Worker matricide in social bees and wasps
TLDR
Worker matricide represents an extreme form of kin-selected queen-worker conflict over sexual production and is favoured by annual life cycles, late-season colonies, declining queen productivity, male-only production by queens, and single mating. Expand
Can alloethism in workers of the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris, be explained in terms of foraging efficiency?
TLDR
This work established whether workers of the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris (L.) (Hymenoptera; Apidae), exhibit alloethism, and quantified the size of workers engaging in foraging compared to those that remain in the nest, and confirmed that it is the larger bees that tend to forage. Expand
Size variation and foraging rate in bumblebees (Bombus terrestris)
TLDR
Examination of size-dependent interindividual variability in foraging in bumblebees found large foragers contributed disproportionately more to the current nectar influx of their colony. Expand
Development and reproductive strategies in Bombus terrestris colonies
TLDR
The development and the reproductive output of 26 Bombus terrestris colonies were investigated and the loss of dominance by the queen was expressed by the beginning of aggression on the part of queen and workers, worker oviposition, oophagy and the functional elimination of the queen. Expand
Investigations Into the Regulation of Dominance Behaviour and of the Division of Labour in Bumblebee Colonies (Bombus Terrestris)
TLDR
It is concluded that a Bombus terrestris colony is a stable social structure, in which the dominance of the queen and colony needs for food determine the differentiation in foragers or house bees, some of which will become egglayer. Expand
Worker age, size and social status in queenless colonies of the ant Leptothorax gredleri
TLDR
This work investigated what proximately determines a worker's social status in queenless colonies of the ant Leptothorax gredleri and found high-ranking individuals were more active and had greater ovarian development than their low-ranking nestmates. Expand
Thresholds of Response in Nest Thermoregulation by Worker Bumble Bees, Bombus bifarius nearcticus (Hymenoptera: Apidae)
TLDR
It is found that worker bumble bees (Bombus bifarius nearcticus) responded to changes in ambient temperature by altering their rates of performing two tasks - wing fanning and brood cell incubation, which are consistent with a threshold of response model for thermoregulatory behavior of B. bifarian workers. Expand
Reproductive Harmony via Mutual Policing by Workers in Eusocial Hymenoptera
TLDR
Examination of the cause-effect relationship between queen mating frequency and worker policing indicates that worker policing is caused by queen polyandry but thatworker policing is unlikely to cause polyandries, although it may help stabilize it if police workers show behavioral dominance. Expand
Dominance and polyethism in the eusocial wasp Mischocyttarus mastigophorus (Hymenoptera: Vespidae)
TLDR
It is hypothesized that changes in polyethism were enabled by the evolution of increased colony size in the Epiponini, and that dominance interactions do not regulate forager specialization or task partitioning in epiponines. Expand
...
1
2
3
...