Reproductive monopoly enforced by sterile police workers in a queenless ant

@article{CuvillierHot2004ReproductiveME,
  title={Reproductive monopoly enforced by sterile police workers in a queenless ant},
  author={Virginie Cuvillier-Hot and Alain Lenoir and Christian Peeters},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology},
  year={2004},
  volume={15},
  pages={970-975}
}
In societies of totipotent insects, dyadic dominance interactions generate a hierarchy that often underlies an extreme reproductive skew. Subordinates remain infertile but can maximize their indirect fitness benefits through collective power (worker policing): interference with challenging high-rankers can prevent an untimely replacement of the reproductive. However, police workers only benefit if they favor individuals with high fertility. In the monogynous queenless ant Streblognathus… Expand

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