Reproductive health and AIDS prevention in sub-Saharan Africa: the case for increased male participation.

@article{Mbizvo1996ReproductiveHA,
  title={Reproductive health and AIDS prevention in sub-Saharan Africa: the case for increased male participation.},
  author={Michael Mbizvo and Mary T Bassett},
  journal={Health policy and planning},
  year={1996},
  volume={11 1},
  pages={
          84-92
        }
}
Reproduction is a dual commitment, but so often in much of the world, it is seen as wholly the woman's responsibility. She bears the burden not only of pregnancy and childbirth but also the threats from excessive child bearing, some responsibility for contraception, infertility investigation and often undiagnosed sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) including AIDS. Failure to target men in reproductive health interventions has weakened the impact of reproductive health care programmes. The… 
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