Reproductive competition favours solitary living while ecological constraints impose group-living in African striped mice.

@article{Schradin2010ReproductiveCF,
  title={Reproductive competition favours solitary living while ecological constraints impose group-living in African striped mice.},
  author={C. Schradin and B. K{\"o}nig and N. Pillay},
  journal={The Journal of animal ecology},
  year={2010},
  volume={79 3},
  pages={
          515-21
        }
}
1. Social groups typically form due to delayed dispersal of adult offspring when no opportunities for independent breeding exist, or the costs of dispersal are higher than the costs of remaining philopatric. Ecological constraints are thought to be a main reason for group-living in animals. 2. Reproductive competition within groups can induce high costs of philopatry, and is thought to be a main reason for solitary living. 3. Experimental manipulation of reproductive competition is difficult… Expand
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