Reproductive Success, Group Size, and the Evolution of Cooperative Breeding in the Acorn Woodpecker

@article{Koenig1981ReproductiveSG,
  title={Reproductive Success, Group Size, and the Evolution of Cooperative Breeding in the Acorn Woodpecker},
  author={Walter D. Koenig},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={1981},
  volume={117},
  pages={421 - 443}
}
  • W. Koenig
  • Published 1981
  • Biology
  • The American Naturalist
Acorn woodpeckers are cooperative breeders which live in family groups of up to 12 adults. Analysis of the reproductive success and subsequent survivorship of young within groups indicates that (1) yearly variation in conditions, (2) prior group history, (3) territory quality, and (4) group size all contribute substantially to the variability of these data. Of these, (1) and (2) are the most important. An analysis of covariance of reproductive success versus variables (1) to (4) above indicates… Expand
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