Reproduction in Early Amniotes

@article{Sander2012ReproductionIE,
  title={Reproduction in Early Amniotes},
  author={P. M. Sander},
  journal={Science},
  year={2012},
  volume={337},
  pages={806 - 808}
}
Recent fossil finds help to explain why the early fossil record is dominated by live-bearing amniotes, although live-bearing amniotes evolved later than egg-laying ones. The conquest of dry land by vertebrate animals began with the evolution of the first four-legged, amphibious animals ∼360 million years ago (1, 2). Amniotes originated ∼50 million years later (1) and have since become the most diverse clade of land-living vertebrates, including mammals, turtles, lizards, snakes, crocodiles, and… Expand

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