Reproduction by subordinates in cooperatively breeding Arabian babblers is uncommon but predictable

@article{Lundy1998ReproductionBS,
  title={Reproduction by subordinates in cooperatively breeding Arabian babblers is uncommon but predictable},
  author={K. J. Lundy and Patricia G. Parker and Amotz Zahavi},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={1998},
  volume={43},
  pages={173-180}
}
Abstract In a genetic analysis of the mating system of cooperatively breeding Arabian babblers (Timalidae: Turdoides squamiceps), we identified which individuals in the population are breeding, and how reproductive success was distributed among group members with respect to their dominance rank, for both males and females. The population was characterized by an asymmetrical distribution of reproductive success; behaviorally dominant males produced 176 of 186 (95%) of the offspring in 44 social… Expand

Figures and Tables from this paper

Monogamous dominant pairs monopolize reproduction in the cooperatively breeding pied babbler
TLDR
Genetic data are used from a population of cooperatively breeding pied babblers to show that reproduction is highly skewed toward behaviorally dominant birds, and helping in this species confers indirect fitness benefits on subordinates, which are likely to play an important role in the evolution and maintenance of cooperative helping behavior. Expand
Mixed mating strategies in cooperatively breeding apostlebirds Struthidea cinerea
TLDR
Investigating mating patterns within 18 groups of apostlebirds using a set of six polymorphic microsatellite loci found that Apostlebirds appear to adopt flexible and context-dependent mating strategies, with both monogamy and polygamy detected in separate groups. Expand
Multiple paternity in the cooperatively breeding fish Neolamprologus pulcher
In cooperative breeders, mature males may compete for fertilizations. In this study, we measured the degree of multiple paternity in a natural population of a cooperatively breeding fish.Expand
Coalitions of relatives and reproductive skew in cooperatively breeding white-winged choughs
TLDR
DNA fingerprinting is used to examine reproductive skew in cooperatively breeding white-winged choughs and demonstrates the advantage of operating in coalitions, and suggests the acquisition of future allies may be a major benefit of helping behaviour in this species. Expand
Kinship and its consequences in the cooperatively breeding southern pied babbler Turdoides bicolor
TLDR
This thesis uses genetic and observational data to explore kinship between individuals in groups of wild Southern Pied Babblers Turdoides bicolor and shows that changes in relatedness between donors and recipients of help do not affect the amount of food that is given to chicks, thus providing no support for indirect kin-selected benefits as a primary cause of helping behaviour in this species. Expand
Patterns of Reproductive Skew in the Polygynandrous Acorn Woodpecker
TLDR
It is suggested that models of reproductive skew will need to include competitive interactions among potential breeders and mate choice before they will adequately predict patterns of reproductive partitioning in most vertebrate societies. Expand
Sex‐biased preferential care in the cooperatively breeding Arabian babbler
TLDR
It is shown that in the cooperatively breeding Arabian babbler (Turdoides squamiceps), parents preferentially feed male offspring when relative group size is small, and female offspring when group size was large, which emphasizes the complexity of investment strategies in relation to social circumstances. Expand
Demography of male reproductive queues in cooperatively breeding superb fairy-wrens Malurus cyaneus.
TLDR
Fairy-wren queues are likely to be stable because older birds are superior, and because extra-pair mating provides direct benefits to subordinates, but it is unclear why such queues should be stable. Expand
Competition over guarding in the Arabian babbler (Turdoides squamiceps), a cooperative breeder.
TLDR
It is suggested that by investing in guarding and by intervening in the guarding of its competitors, a babbler demonstrates and signals its quality and its control over its competitor, thereby increasing its prestige and consequently its direct fitness. Expand
Competition over guarding in the Arabian babbler (Turdoides squamiceps), a cooperative breeder
TLDR
It is suggested that by investing in guarding and by intervening in the guarding of its competitors, a babbler demonstrates and signals its quality and its control over its competitor, thereby increasing its prestige and consequently its direct fitness. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 36 REFERENCES
Shared paternity revealed by genetic analysis in cooperatively breeding tropical wrens
POSTPONEMENT of dispersal and breeding to assist in rearing others' young may be favoured if helpers' contributions to the production of close kin exceed their likely reproductive success had theyExpand
Extra-pair paternity uncommon in the cooperatively breeding bicolored wren
Abstract We investigated parentage using multilocus DNA fingerprinting for 222 juveniles produced during 99 group-years in the bicolored wren Campylorhynchus griseus, a cooperatively breeding bird ofExpand
COSTS AND BENEFITS OF EXTRA-GROUP PATERNITY IN SUPERB FAIRY-WRENS
TLDR
A detailed know-edge of the alternatives available to females (other sources of parental assistance) and males (opportunities for extra-pair matings) may be necessary to understand male and female reproductive strategies. Expand
Relatedness, polyandry and extra-group paternity in the cooperatively-breeding white-browed scrubwren (Sericornis frontalis )
TLDR
DNA fingerprinting used to examine the genetic parentage and mating system of the cooperatively breeding white-browed scrubwren, Sericornis frontalis, in Canberra, Australia revealed a remarkable variety of mating tactics and social organization. Expand
Parental care and mating behaviour of polyandrous dunnocks Prunella modularis related to paternity by DNA fingerprinting
TLDR
It is shown that in the dunnock Prunella modularis, a small passerine bird with a variable mating system, males do not discriminate between their own young and those of another male in multiply-sired broods, which is a good predictor of paternity. Expand
Shared paternity among non-relatives is a result of an egalitarian mating system in a communally breeding bird, the pukeko
TLDR
It is reported that within communally breeding groups of pukeko (.Porphyrio porphyrio) dominant males do not guard their mates and rarely interrupt the copulations of unrelated rival males, which meets the conditions of a model that predicts that unrelated individuals who form breeding coalitions should interact in an egalitarian manner. Expand
Mating relationships and breeding suppression in the dwarf mongoose
TLDR
Dwarf mongooses live in packs containing a dominant breeding pair that produces litters at regular intervals, usually three times per year, and the alpha pair are likely to be the parents of the great majority of young born in the pack. Expand
Helping behaviour in brown hyenas
TLDR
The results of a 7-yr study of brown hyenas in which most kinships were known are described, and asymmetries in helping among clan members according to sex and relatedness are reported. Expand
A molecular genetic analysis of kinship and cooperation in African lions
TLDR
A new application of DNA fingerprinting is described that unequivocally demonstrates the kinship structure of lion 'prides': female companions are always closely related, male companions are either closely related or unrelated, and mating partners are usually unrelated. Expand
Helpers-at-the-nest in European Bee-eaters ( Merops apiaster ): a Genetic Analysis
TLDR
DNA fingerprinting was used in conjunction with detailed field observations over eight years to analyse the helping behaviour of European bee-eaters (Merops apiaster), showing that every chick from unhelped families could be correctly assigned to their putative parents. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
...