Representativeness and Motivations of the Contemporary Donorate: Results from Merged Survey and Administrative Records

@article{Hill2017RepresentativenessAM,
  title={Representativeness and Motivations of the Contemporary Donorate: Results from Merged Survey and Administrative Records},
  author={Seth J. Hill and Gregory A. Huber},
  journal={Political Behavior},
  year={2017},
  volume={39},
  pages={3-29}
}
Only a small portion of Americans make campaign donations, yet because ambitious politicians need these resources, this group may be particularly important for shaping political outcomes. We investigate the characteristics and motivations of the donorate using a novel dataset that combines administrative records of two types of political participation, contributing and voting, with a rich set of survey variables. These merged observations allow us to examine differences in demographics… Expand
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