Representation of Visual Gravitational Motion in the Human Vestibular Cortex

@article{Indovina2005RepresentationOV,
  title={Representation of Visual Gravitational Motion in the Human Vestibular Cortex},
  author={Iole Indovina and Vincenzo Maffei and Gianfranco Bosco and Myrka Zago and Emiliano Macaluso and Francesco Lacquaniti},
  journal={Science},
  year={2005},
  volume={308},
  pages={416 - 419}
}
How do we perceive the visual motion of objects that are accelerated by gravity? We propose that, because vision is poorly sensitive to accelerations, an internal model that calculates the effects of gravity is derived from graviceptive information, is stored in the vestibular cortex, and is activated by visual motion that appears to be coherent with natural gravity. The acceleration of visual targets was manipulated while brain activity was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging… Expand

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