Reporting Sexual Victimization To The Police And Others

@article{Fisher2003ReportingSV,
  title={Reporting Sexual Victimization To The Police And Others},
  author={Bonnie S. Fisher and Leah E. Daigle and Francis T. Cullen and Michael G. Turner},
  journal={Criminal Justice and Behavior},
  year={2003},
  volume={30},
  pages={38 - 6}
}
Beginning with Koss, Gidycz, and Wisniewski’s pathbreaking study, the sexual victimization of female college students has emerged as salient research and policy concern. Building on this earlier work, we used a national, random sample of 4,446 female college students to focus on an issue of continuing importance: the level and determinants of victims’ willingness to report their sexual victimization. The analysis revealed that although few incidents—including rapes—are reported to the police… 
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