Report: Alcohol Consumption and Risk of Colon Cancer: Evidence From the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey I Epidemiologic Follow-Up Study

@article{Su2004ReportAC,
  title={Report: Alcohol Consumption and Risk of Colon Cancer: Evidence From the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey I Epidemiologic Follow-Up Study},
  author={L Joseph Su and Lenore Arab},
  journal={Nutrition and Cancer},
  year={2004},
  volume={50},
  pages={111 - 119}
}
Abstract: The epidemiologic findings on the relationship between alcohol consumption and colon cancer are inconsistent. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) I Epidemiologic Follow-Up Study (NHEFS) included a prospective cohort population representative of the general U.S. population, which had not been fully utilized for examining the risk between colon cancer and alcohol drinking. The NHEFS consisted of 10,220 participants prospectively followed over a decade. Alcohol… 

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