Reply to Russell Graham about Mustela macrodon

@article{Mead2001ReplyTR,
  title={Reply to Russell Graham about Mustela macrodon},
  author={Jim I. Mead and Arthur E. Spiess},
  journal={Quaternary Research},
  year={2001},
  volume={56},
  pages={422 - 423}
}
  • J. Mead, A. Spiess
  • Published 1 November 2001
  • Environmental Science
  • Quaternary Research
One wonderful thing about science is the ability to have a difference of opinion and a variation in how one views data. In 2000 we provided an article about the description of the skeleton of the extinct sea mink, Mustela macrodon(Mead et al., 2000). We used subfossil specimens from a number of archaeological localities (from the Gulf of Maine), but in particular we used the large sample from the Turner Farm site on North Haven Island. We compared these remains of archaic age to modern… 

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References

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Comment on “Skeleton of Extinct North American Sea Mink (Mustela macrodon)” by Mead et al.

  • R. Graham
  • Environmental Science, Biology
    Quaternary Research
  • 2001
TLDR
It is shown in the comment that the large and small individuals in the archaeological samples represent males and females of the phenon macrodon and that they are not the result of the mixing of mainland and island populations, which means “body” size for this population is larger than modern subspecies but there is considerable overlap between the fossil and modern populations.

Skeleton of Extinct North American Sea Mink (Mustela macrodon)

Abstract Mustela macrodon (extinct sea mink) is known only from prehistoric and historic Native American shell middens dating less than 5100 years old along coastal islands of the Gulf of Maine,

The extinct mink from the Maine shell heaps. Forest and Stream 61

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The extinct mink from the Maine shell heaps

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A functional classification of the coastal systems of the United States

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Comment on skeleton of extinct North American sea mink ( Mustela macrodon ) by Jim I . Mead , Arthur E . Spiess , and Kristin D . Sobolik

  • Quaternary Research
  • 2001

The Gulf of Maine

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