Reply: The Persistence of Folly: A Critical Examination of Dissociative Identity Disorder

@article{Piper2005ReplyTP,
  title={Reply: The Persistence of Folly: A Critical Examination of Dissociative Identity Disorder},
  author={A. Piper and H. Merskey},
  journal={The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry},
  year={2005},
  volume={50},
  pages={814 - 814}
}
Dear Editor: This letter is in reply to Dr Piper's and Dr Merskey 's 2 papers on the "folly" of the concept of dissociative identity disorder (DID) (1,2). Psychiatrists are, of course, entitled to their opinions about any disorder; however, the prominence given these 2 papers may create the impression that the authors have the imprimatur of the Canadian Psychiatric Association. I'm puzzled by why 2 authors who have obviously never treated DID (they say it doesn't exist) are given such coverage… Expand
Commentary: The Rise and Persistence of Dissociative Identity Disorder
  • C. Ross
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of trauma & dissociation : the official journal of the International Society for the Study of Dissociation
  • 2013
TLDR
A critique of Joel Paris (2012), the editor of the Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, which states that those who criticized the diagnosis and proposed eliminating the category entirely have been marginalized, and violates the DSM rule that substantial changes to editions of the manual must be based on evidence, not opinion. Expand
The Persistence of Folly: A Critical Examination of Dissociative Identity Disorder. Part I. The Excesses of an Improbable Concept
  • A. Piper, H. Merskey
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Canadian journal of psychiatry. Revue canadienne de psychiatrie
  • 2004
TLDR
There is no proof for the claim that DID results from childhood trauma and the condition cannot be reliably diagnosed, and it is best understood as a culture-bound and often iatrogenic condition. Expand
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Although some suggest that dissociated identity states are the product of over-zealous clinicians, the history of schizophrenia tells a different story. From Jean-Martin Charcot’s exhibitionistExpand
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Background: Dissociative identity disorder (DID) is a disputed psychiatric disorder. Research findings and clinical observations suggest that DID involves an authentic mental disorder related toExpand
The Classification of Hysteria and Related Disorders: Historical and Phenomenological Considerations
  • C. North
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Behavioral sciences
  • 2015
TLDR
The history of the conceptualization of dissociative, conversion, and somatoform syndromes in relation to one another is examined, and a new phenomenologically-based classification scheme is proposed that is more compatible with the agnostic and atheoretical approach to diagnosis of mental disorders used by the current classification system is proposed. Expand
Cross-examining dissociative identity disorder: Neuroimaging and etiology on trial
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Whether brain imaging studies can inform the judiciary and/or distinguish the etiology of dissociative identity disorder is discussed. Expand
Culture-bound dissociation: a comparative analysis.
  • E. Somer
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • The Psychiatric clinics of North America
  • 2006
TLDR
The cross-cultural perspective offered in this article aims to explore commonalities across cultural variations in phenomena involving altered states of consciousness (ASC) and to resolve identified discrepancies in divergent idiom and classification systems. Expand
Fact or Factitious? A Psychobiological Study of Authentic and Simulated Dissociative Identity States
TLDR
The findings are at odds with the idea that differences among different types of dissociative identity states in DID can be explained by high fantasy proneness, motivated role-enactment, and suggestion and indicate that DID does not have a sociocultural origin. Expand
Contemporary concepts of dissociation.
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Some researchers and theorists suggest return to the original understanding of dissociation as a basic premise for the further development of the concept of Dissociation. Expand
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References

SHOWING 1-2 OF 2 REFERENCES
The Persistence of Folly: Critical Examination of Dissociative Identity Disorder. Part II. The Defence and Decline of Multiple Personality or Dissociative Identity Disorder
  • A. Piper, H. Merskey
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Canadian journal of psychiatry. Revue canadienne de psychiatrie
  • 2004
TLDR
Because the diagnosis is unreliable, it is believed that US and Canadian courts cannot responsibly accept testimony in favour of DID and a guess is made about the condition's status over the next 10 years. Expand
The Persistence of Folly: A Critical Examination of Dissociative Identity Disorder. Part I. The Excesses of an Improbable Concept
  • A. Piper, H. Merskey
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Canadian journal of psychiatry. Revue canadienne de psychiatrie
  • 2004
TLDR
There is no proof for the claim that DID results from childhood trauma and the condition cannot be reliably diagnosed, and it is best understood as a culture-bound and often iatrogenic condition. Expand