Replication stress and cancer

@article{Gaillard2015ReplicationSA,
  title={Replication stress and cancer},
  author={H{\'e}l{\`e}ne Gaillard and Tatiana Garc{\'i}a-Muse and Andr{\'e}s Aguilera},
  journal={Nature Reviews Cancer},
  year={2015},
  volume={15},
  pages={276-289}
}
Genome instability is a hallmark of cancer, and DNA replication is the most vulnerable cellular process that can lead to it. Any condition leading to high levels of DNA damage will result in replication stress, which is a source of genome instability and a feature of pre-cancerous and cancerous cells. Therefore, understanding the molecular basis of replication stress is crucial to the understanding of tumorigenesis. Although a negative aspect of replication stress is its prominent role in… 

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