Replication of the recessive STBMS1 locus but with dominant inheritance.

@article{Rice2009ReplicationOT,
  title={Replication of the recessive STBMS1 locus but with dominant inheritance.},
  author={Aine Rice and J{\'e}r{\'e}mie Nsengimana and Ian G Simmons and Carmel Toomes and Janice Hoole and Colin E. Willoughby and Frances Cassidy and Grange A Williams and Nick D L George and Eamonn Sheridan and Terri L. Young and Tim I. Hunter and Brendan T Barrett and David B Elliott and D. Tim Bishop and Chris F. Inglehearn},
  journal={Investigative ophthalmology \& visual science},
  year={2009},
  volume={50 7},
  pages={
          3210-7
        }
}
PURPOSE Strabismus is a common eye disorder with a prevalence of 1% to 4%. Comitant strabismus accounts for approximately 75% of all strabismus, yet more is known about the less common incomitant disorders. Comitant strabismus is at least partly inherited, but only one recessive genetic susceptibility locus, on chromosome 7p, has been identified in one family. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of STBMS1 as a cause of primary nonsyndromic comitant esotropia (PNCE… Expand
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