Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment resistant depression: Re-establishing connections

@article{Anderson2016RepetitiveTM,
  title={Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment resistant depression: Re-establishing connections},
  author={Rodney J. Anderson and Kate E. Hoy and Zafiris J. Daskalakis and Paul B. Fitzgerald},
  journal={Clinical Neurophysiology},
  year={2016},
  volume={127},
  pages={3394-3405}
}
Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a relatively recent addition to the neurostimulation armamentarium for treating individuals suffering from treatment refractory depression and has demonstrated efficacy in clinical trials. One of the proposed mechanisms of action underlying the therapeutic effects of rTMS for depression involves the modulation of depression-associated dysfunctional activity in distributed brain networks involving frontal cortical and subcortical limbic… Expand
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