Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of Broca's Area Affects Verbal Responses to Gesture Observation

@article{Gentilucci2006RepetitiveTM,
  title={Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of Broca's Area Affects Verbal Responses to Gesture Observation},
  author={Maurizio Gentilucci and Paolo Bernardis and Girolamo Crisi and Riccardo Dalla Volta},
  journal={Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience},
  year={2006},
  volume={18},
  pages={1059-1074}
}
The aim of the present study was to determine whether Broca's area is involved in translating some aspects of arm gesture representations into mouth articulation gestures. In Experiment 1, we applied low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over Broca's area and over the symmetrical loci of the right hemisphere of participants responding verbally to communicative spoken words, to gestures, or to the simultaneous presentation of the two signals. We performed also sham… 
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