Corpus ID: 22581465

Repetitive TMS of the somatosensory cortex improves writer's cramp and enhances cortical activity.

@article{Havrnkov2010RepetitiveTO,
  title={Repetitive TMS of the somatosensory cortex improves writer's cramp and enhances cortical activity.},
  author={P. Havr{\'a}nkov{\'a} and R. Jech and N. Walker and G. Operto and J. Tauchmanova and J. Vymazal and P. Du{\vs}ek and M. Hromcik and E. Rů{\vz}i{\vc}ka},
  journal={Neuro endocrinology letters},
  year={2010},
  volume={31 1},
  pages={
          73-86
        }
}
Since the somatosensory system is believed to be affected in focal dystonia, we focused on the modulation of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in order to improve symptoms of writer's cramp. Patients with writer's cramp (N=9 in the pilot study and N=11 in the advanced study) were treated with 30-minute 1 Hz real- or sham-rTMS of the SI cortex every day for 5 days. Before and after rTMS, 1.5 T fMRI was examined during simple hand… Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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