Repeated writing facilitates children’s memory for pseudocharacters and foreign letters

@article{Naka1998RepeatedWF,
  title={Repeated writing facilitates children’s memory for pseudocharacters and foreign letters},
  author={Makiko Naka},
  journal={Memory \& Cognition},
  year={1998},
  volume={26},
  pages={804-809}
}
  • M. Naka
  • Published 1 July 1998
  • Education
  • Memory & Cognition
In a logographic language culture,repeated (hand)writing is a common memory strategy for learning letters and Chinese characters. The purpose of this paper is to determine whether this strategy facilitates children’s memory for pseudologographic characters and foreign letters. It also explores which aspect of writing, the use of stroke orders or the writing action itself, is responsible for the effect. First, third, and fifth grade Japanese children participated in the study. Results showed… 

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