Repeated testing improves long‐term retention relative to repeated study: a randomised controlled trial

@article{Larsen2009RepeatedTI,
  title={Repeated testing improves long‐term retention relative to repeated study: a randomised controlled trial},
  author={Douglas P Larsen and Andrew C. Butler and Henry L Roediger III},
  journal={Medical Education},
  year={2009},
  volume={43}
}
CONTEXT Laboratory studies in cognitive psychology with relatively brief final recall intervals suggest that repeated retrieval in the form of tests may result in better retention of information compared with repeated study. [] Key Method Residents were randomised to two counter-balanced groups which either took tests on status epilepticus and studied a review sheet on myasthenia gravis (SE-T/MG-S group) or took tests on myasthenia gravis and studied a review sheet on status epilepticus (MG-T/SE-S group…
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This randomised controlled study investigated how cumulative assessment affects time spent on self‐study and test performance compared with end‐of‐course assessment.
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The review shows that the forward effect of testing is a well replicated phenomenon in laboratory studies that has been observed for both veridical information and misinformation, and demonstrates that the effect may be applied to educational and clinical settings, enhancing learning in students and reducing memory deficits in clinical populations.
Repeated testing produces superior transfer of learning relative to repeated studying.
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  • Psychology
    Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition
  • 2010
TLDR
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Prior episodic learning and the efficacy of retrieval practice
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Results support the hypothesis that the advantage of testing over restudy is independent of the degree of prior episodic learning, and they suggest that educators can apply cued-recall testing with the expectation that its efficacy is similar across varying levels of prior content learning.
The effects of test-enhanced learning on long-term retention in AAN annual meeting courses
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Whereas annual meeting continuing medical education (CME) courses lead to long-term gains in knowledge, when repeated quizzing is added, retention is significantly increased and CME planners may consider adding repeat quizzing to increase the impact of their courses.
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