Repeated mass strandings of Miocene marine mammals from Atacama Region of Chile point to sudden death at sea

@article{Pyenson2014RepeatedMS,
  title={Repeated mass strandings of Miocene marine mammals from Atacama Region of Chile point to sudden death at sea},
  author={N. Pyenson and Carolina S Gutstein and J. F. Parham and J. L. Le Roux and Catalina Carre{\~n}o Chavarr{\'i}a and H. Little and Adam Metallo and Vince Rossi and Ana M. Valenzuela-Toro and J. V{\'e}lez-Juarbe and C. Santelli and D. R. Rogers and M. Cozzuol and M. Su{\'a}rez},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2014},
  volume={281}
}
Marine mammal mass strandings have occurred for millions of years, but their origins defy singular explanations. Beyond human causes, mass strandings have been attributed to herding behaviour, large-scale oceanographic fronts and harmful algal blooms (HABs). Because algal toxins cause organ failure in marine mammals, HABs are the most common mass stranding agent with broad geographical and widespread taxonomic impact. Toxin-mediated mortalities in marine food webs have the potential to occur… Expand
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