Repeat Manipulation Under Anesthesia For Persistent Stiffness After Total Knee Arthroplasty Achieves Functional Range of Motion.

Abstract

Poor range of motion may decrease a patient's ability to participate in activities of daily living after total knee arthroplasty. Manipulation under anesthesia has been shown to improve range of motion; however, some patients have persistent stiffness even after manipulation. The goal of this study was to evaluate the outcomes and complications of patients who underwent a second manipulation under anesthesia for persistent stiffness after total knee arthroplasty. The review of surgical records of two joint arthroplasty surgeons identified 226 knees in 210 patients who underwent a manipulation under anesthesia for poor range of motion after total knee arthroplasty. Of these patients, 16 patients underwent a second manipulation under anesthesia. For patients undergoing two manipulations under anesthesia procedures, at latest follow up (mean 539 days), mean extension improved from 10.50° to 2.50° (p=0.001) and mean flexion improved from 87.50° to 112.69° (p=0.001) respectively. SF-12 scores were available for 12 of 16 knees with a mean score of 34.42. Two of 16 patients (12.5%) experienced a complication. Three of 16 (18.8%) patients who underwent a second manipulation required a revision arthroplasty procedure. In conclusion, a second manipulation under anesthesia can achieve functional range of motion that is sustained after total knee arthroplasty.

Cite this paper

@article{Ferrel2015RepeatMU, title={Repeat Manipulation Under Anesthesia For Persistent Stiffness After Total Knee Arthroplasty Achieves Functional Range of Motion.}, author={Jason R Ferrel and Richard L. Davis and Obiajulu A J C Agha and Joel R. Politi}, journal={Surgical technology international}, year={2015}, volume={26}, pages={256-60} }