Reorientation and faulting of Pluto due to volatile loading within Sputnik Planitia

@article{Keane2016ReorientationAF,
  title={Reorientation and faulting of Pluto due to volatile loading within Sputnik Planitia},
  author={James Tuttle Keane and Isamu Matsuyama and Shunichi Kamata and Jordan K. Steckloff},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2016},
  volume={540},
  pages={90-93}
}
Pluto is an astoundingly diverse, geologically dynamic world. The dominant feature is Sputnik Planitia—a tear-drop-shaped topographic depression approximately 1,000 kilometres in diameter possibly representing an ancient impact basin. The interior of Sputnik Planitia is characterized by a smooth, craterless plain three to four kilometres beneath the surrounding rugged uplands, and represents the surface of a massive unit of actively convecting volatile ices (N2, CH4 and CO) several kilometres… 
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It is argued that if Sputnik Planitia did indeed form as a result of an impact and if Pluto possesses a subsurface ocean, the required positive gravity anomaly would naturally result because of shell thinning and ocean uplift, followed by later modest nitrogen deposition.
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