Reorganization of Southern Ocean Plankton Ecosystem at the Onset of Antarctic Glaciation

@article{Houben2013ReorganizationOS,
  title={Reorganization of Southern Ocean Plankton Ecosystem at the Onset of Antarctic Glaciation},
  author={Alexander J. P. Houben and Peter K. Bijl and J{\"o}rg Pross and Steven M. Bohaty and Sandra Passchier and Catherine E. Stickley and Ursula (Ulla) R{\"o}hl and Saiko Sugisaki and Lisa Tauxe and Tina van de Flierdt and Matthew P Olney and Francesca Sangiorgi and Appy Sluijs and Carlota Escutia and Henk Brinkhuis},
  journal={Science},
  year={2013},
  volume={340},
  pages={341 - 344}
}
Southern Change Antarctica has been mostly covered by ice since the inception of large-scale continental glaciation during the Oligocene, which profoundly altered the isotopic and mineralogical records of the sediments surrounding the continent. Houben et al. (p. 341) found records of the corresponding living systems in the fossil marine dinoflagellate cysts, which revealed that a microplankton ecosystem, similar to the one that exists today, appeared simultaneously with the first major… 
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The long-term geological record reveals an early Cenozoic warm climate that supported smaller polar ecosystems, few coral-algal reefs, expanded shallow-water platforms, longer food chains with less energy for top predators, and a less oxygenated ocean.
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