Renaming “Chemobrain”

@article{Hurria2007Renaming,
  title={Renaming “Chemobrain”},
  author={Arti Hurria and George Somlo and Tim A Ahles},
  journal={Cancer Investigation},
  year={2007},
  volume={25},
  pages={373 - 377}
}
A subset of breast cancer survivors are reporting cognitive impairment after cancer treatment, which has commonly been attributed to the receipt of chemotherapy and colloquially termed “chemobrain.” For some, a fear of this side effect enters into their decision regarding therapy. Our review of the literature reveals that so-called “chemobrain” is complex and that factors other than chemotherapy may affect cognitive function, including the impact of surgery and anesthesia, hormonal therapy… 
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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  • Biology, Medicine
    Breast cancer : basic and clinical research
  • 2012
TLDR
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TLDR
The results suggest that chemotherapy for BC with a FEC regimen can have a negative effect on cognition, with acute deficits seem to be larger when taxanes are added, but treatment seems to affect cognition also at long term.
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TLDR
It was the intention of this study to capture experiences and perceptions of cognitive impairment as told by people receiving chemotherapy to develop knowledge and skills to recognise and address chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment.
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TLDR
The growth of malignant non-CNS tumors impacted metabolic processes in the brain, affecting protein biosynthesis, and amino acid and sphingolipid metabolism, and may have potential mechanistic value for future analysis of the tumor brain phenomenon.
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TLDR
Findings from the group analyses provided limited support at the 95% confidence level for the hypothesis that women treated with chemotherapy would demonstrate significantly worse cognitive functioning over a 9-month post treatment follow-up period relative to women not treating with chemotherapy for breast cancer.
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