Reminiscence bump in memory for public events

@article{Janssen2008ReminiscenceBI,
  title={Reminiscence bump in memory for public events},
  author={Steve M. J. Janssen and Jaap M. J. Murre and Martijn Meeter},
  journal={European Journal of Cognitive Psychology},
  year={2008},
  volume={20},
  pages={738 - 764}
}
People tend to recall more personal events from adolescence and early adulthood than from other lifetime periods. Most evidence suggests that differential encoding causes this reminiscence bump. However, the question why personal events are encoded better in those periods is still unanswered. To shed more light on this discussion, we examined memory for public events. Since it is often impossible to ascertain that queried events are equally difficult, we circumvented the issue of equivalence by… 
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Surprisingly, the reminiscence bump consisted of relatively fewer novel, emotional, important positive or negative events, increasing the likelihood of an alternative explanation—namely, that memory is generally enhanced in adolescence and early adulthood.
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TLDR
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TLDR
Past events and future predictions were asked and the temporal distribution and factors that made these salient in event representations were examined, supporting the view that remembering the past is largely influenced by the current goals and experiences.
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Researchers have consistently found that older adults report a higher percentage of autobiographical memories for experiences that occurred between ages 15 and 30 compared to any other period of
The reminiscence bump in autobiographical memory and for public events: A comparison across different cueing methods
TLDR
The bump for autobiographical memories versus the bump for memories of public events was compared between-subjects, and did not yield support for any of the dominant existing accounts of the bump as underlying the bump in word-cued memories.
The temporal distribution of autobiographical memory: changes in reliving and vividness over the life span do not explain the reminiscence bump
TLDR
The memories from the period in which the participants were between 6 and 20 years old were not relived more or recalled more vividly than memories from other lifetime periods, suggesting that they do not involve more recollection.
Life-span retrieval of public events: Reminiscence bump for high-impact events, recency for others
TLDR
Reminiscence bump observed for the two public events suggest that age-at-event affects recall of public events to the degree that the events are high-impact ones that dominate nation’s collective memory.
Using the phenomenology of memory for recent events to bridge the gap between episodic and semantic memory.
TLDR
Public events provide a novel way of examining how episodically experienced events might become semanticized and integrated into the knowledge base, and suggest that memory for public events shares phenomenological features with both episodic/event memory and semantic memory.
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