Remembering Early Childhood

@article{Newcombe2000RememberingEC,
  title={Remembering Early Childhood},
  author={N. Newcombe and A. B. Drummey and N. Fox and E. Lie and Wendy Ottinger-Alberts},
  journal={Current Directions in Psychological Science},
  year={2000},
  volume={9},
  pages={55 - 58}
}
In this article, we consider recent research on three questions about people's memories for their early childhood: whether childhood amnesia is a real phenomenon, whether implicit memories survive when explicit memories do not, and why early episodic memories are sketchy. The research leads us to form three conclusions. First, we argue that childhood amnesia is a real phenomenon, as long as the term is defined clearly. Specifically, people are able to recall parts of their lives from the period… Expand
38 Citations
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