Religious involvement and U.S. adult mortality

@article{Hummer2011ReligiousIA,
  title={Religious involvement and U.S. adult mortality},
  author={Robert A Hummer and Richard G. Rogers and Charles b. Nam and Christopher G. Ellison},
  journal={Demography},
  year={2011},
  volume={36},
  pages={273-285}
}
We use recently released, nationally representative data from the National Health Interview Survey—Multiple Cause of Death linked file to model the association of religious attendance and sociodemographic, health, and behavioral correlates with overall and cause-specific mortality. Religious attendance is associated with U.S. adult mortality in a graded fashion: People who never attend exhibit 1.87 times the risk of death in the follow-up period compared with people who attend more than once a… 

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