Religious delusions in patients admitted to hospital with schizophrenia

@article{Siddle2002ReligiousDI,
  title={Religious delusions in patients admitted to hospital with schizophrenia},
  author={R. Siddle and G. Haddock and N. Tarrier and E. Faragher},
  journal={Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology},
  year={2002},
  volume={37},
  pages={130-138}
}
Background Religious delusions are clinically important because they may be associated with selfharm and poorer outcomes from treatment. They have not been extensively researched. This study sought to investigate the prevalence of religious delusions in a sample of patients admitted to hospital with schizophrenia, to describe these delusions and to compare the characteristics of the patients with religious delusions with schizophrenia patients with all other types of delusion. Method A cross… Expand
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