Religious Segregation and the Emergence of Integrated Schools in Northern Ireland

@article{Smith2001ReligiousSA,
  title={Religious Segregation and the Emergence of Integrated Schools in Northern Ireland},
  author={Alan Smith},
  journal={Oxford Review of Education},
  year={2001},
  volume={27},
  pages={559 - 575}
}
  • Alan Smith
  • Published 1 December 2001
  • Education
  • Oxford Review of Education
A distinctive characteristic of the education system in Northern Ireland is that most Protestant and Catholic children attend separate schools. Following the partition of Ireland the Protestant Churches transferred their schools to the new state in return for full funding and representation in the management of state controlled schools and non-denominational religious instruction was given a statutory place within such schools. The Catholic Church retained control over its own system of… 

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