Religiosity and Desistance From Drug Use

@article{Chu2007ReligiosityAD,
  title={Religiosity and Desistance From Drug Use},
  author={Doris C. Chu},
  journal={Criminal Justice and Behavior},
  year={2007},
  volume={34},
  pages={661 - 679}
}
  • Doris C. Chu
  • Published 4 April 2007
  • Law, Psychology
  • Criminal Justice and Behavior
Recent research acknowledges an inverse relationship between religiosity and crime (though some claim it is a modest one), but no desistance theories to date include religiosity in their model to help explain desistance from drug use. A better understanding of how religiosity is related to the initiation of and desistance from drug use can lead to more effective preventive and rehabilitative interventions. Data derived from Wave 5 to Wave 7 of the National Youth Survey are employed to test… 

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