• Corpus ID: 140788622

Religion, ethnicity and colonialism as explanations of the Northern Ireland conflict

@inproceedings{Clayton1998ReligionEA,
  title={Religion, ethnicity and colonialism as explanations of the Northern Ireland conflict},
  author={Pamela M. Clayton},
  year={1998}
}
Northern Ireland is not only a problem because of the conflict and lack of political progress; it is also a problem about which theoretical questions can be asked and for which an explanatory framework can be sought. People have accordingly asked questions, and from a wide range of disciplines, including economics, history, political science, psychology, social psychology, social anthropology and sociology. Each of these, furthermore, incorporates different tendencies and schools of thought. So… 

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TLDR
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