Reliable novelty: New should not trump true

@article{Brembs2019ReliableNN,
  title={Reliable novelty: New should not trump true},
  author={B. Brembs},
  journal={PLoS Biology},
  year={2019},
  volume={17}
}
  • B. Brembs
  • Published 2019
  • Medicine, Biology
  • PLoS Biology
Although a case can be made for rewarding scientists for risky, novel science rather than for incremental, reliable science, novelty without reliability ceases to be science. The currently available evidence suggests that the most prestigious journals are no better at detecting unreliable science than other journals. In fact, some of the most convincing studies show a negative correlation, with the most prestigious journals publishing the least reliable science. With the credibility of science… Expand

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