Reliability and procedural validity of UM-CIDI DSM-III-R phobic disorders

@article{Wittchen1996ReliabilityAP,
  title={Reliability and procedural validity of UM-CIDI DSM-III-R phobic disorders},
  author={H‐U. Wittchen and S. Zhao and Jamie Abelson and James L. Abelson and Ronald C. Kessler},
  journal={Psychological Medicine},
  year={1996},
  volume={26},
  pages={1169 - 1177}
}
Synopsis We evaluate the long-term test–retest reliability and procedural validity of phobia diagnoses in the UM-CIDI, the version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, used in the US National Co-morbidity Survey (NCS) and a number of other ongoing large-scale epidemiological surveys. Test–retest reliabilities of lifetime diagnoses of simple phobia, social phobia, and agoraphobia over a period between 16 and 34 months were K = 0·46, 0·47, and 0·63, respectively. Concordances with… 

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