Released under a Creative Commons Attribution-noncommercial-sharealike 3.0 License

  • Published 2012

Abstract

I thought the following four [rules] would be enough, provided that I made a firm and constant resolution not to fail even once in the observance of them. The first was never to accept anything as true if I had not evident knowledge of its being so. . . . The second, to divide each problem I examined into as many parts as was feasible, and as was requisite for its better solution. The third, to direct my thoughts in an orderly way. . . establishing an order in thought even when the objects had no natural priority one to another. And the last, to make throughout such complete enumerations and such general surveys that I might be sure of leaving nothing out.

Cite this paper

@inproceedings{2012ReleasedUA, title={Released under a Creative Commons Attribution-noncommercial-sharealike 3.0 License}, author={}, year={2012} }