Relaxation techniques for pain management in labour.

@article{Smith2018RelaxationTF,
  title={Relaxation techniques for pain management in labour.},
  author={Caroline A. Smith and Kate M Levett and Carmel T. Collins and Mike Armour and Hannah Grace Dahlen and Machiko Suganuma},
  journal={The Cochrane database of systematic reviews},
  year={2018},
  volume={3},
  pages={
          CD009514
        }
}
BACKGROUND Many women would like to avoid pharmacological or invasive methods of pain management in labour and this may contribute to the popularity of complementary methods of pain management. This review examined currently available evidence on the use of relaxation therapies for pain management in labour. This is an update of a review first published in 2011. OBJECTIVES To examine the effects of mind-body relaxation techniques for pain management in labour on maternal and neonatal well… 

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