Relative risks of the uncontrollable (airborne) spread of FMD by different species

@article{Donaldson2001RelativeRO,
  title={Relative risks of the uncontrollable (airborne) spread of FMD by different species},
  author={Alex I Donaldson and Soren Alexandersen and Jens Havskov S{\o}rensen and T. Mikkelsen},
  journal={Veterinary Record},
  year={2001},
  volume={148},
  pages={602 - 604}
}
SNOWDON, W. A. (1966) Growth of foot-and-mouth disease virus in monolayer cultures of calf thyroid cells. Nature 210, 1079 S0RENSEN, J. H., JENSEN, C. O., MIKKELSEN, T., MACKAY, D. K. J. & DONALDSON, A. I. (2001) Modelling the atmospheric dispersion of footand-mouth disease for emergency preparedness. Physics and Chemistry of the Earth B, 26, 93-97 SORENSEN, J. H., MACKAY, D. K. J., JENSEN, C. 0. & DONALDSON, A. I. (2000) An integrated model to predict the atmospheric spread of foot-andmouth… 

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