Relative impact of young adult personality disorders on subsequent quality of life: findings of a community-based longitudinal study.

Abstract

Little is known about long-term prognostic implications of personality disorder (PD) for quality of life (QOL) in the young adult population not selected for psychiatric treatment. The purpose of this study was to determine the association of PDs with QOL assessed after an 11-year interval. PDs were assessed in 1991-1994 at mean age 22, and indicators of QOL were assessed in 2001-2004 at mean age 33 based on a community sample of 588 young adults. Findings indicated that any PD, or a cluster A, B, or C PD each were independently associated with elevated impairment in overall QOL after adjusting for demographic variables, co-occurring Axis I disorder, and physical illness, and PDs in other clusters. Cluster B PD had a greatest adverse impact on QOL. Symptoms of antisocial, borderline, and schizotypal PD symptoms were independently associated with significant reductions in QOL; avoidant, paranoid, and dependent PD symptoms were associated with smaller reductions, not reaching statistical significance. Symptoms of other individual PDs were not associated with reduced QOL. PDs in young adults in the community have an enduring and adverse impact on subsequent QOL that cannot be attributed to physical illness or Axis I psychiatric disorder.

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@article{Chen2006RelativeIO, title={Relative impact of young adult personality disorders on subsequent quality of life: findings of a community-based longitudinal study.}, author={Henian Chen and Patricia Cohen and Thomas N Crawford and Stephanie Kasen and Jeffrey G. Johnson and Kathy R. Berenson}, journal={Journal of personality disorders}, year={2006}, volume={20 5}, pages={510-23} }