Relative Age Effects are a developmental problem in tennis: but not necessarily when you’re left‐handed!

@article{Loffing2010RelativeAE,
  title={Relative Age Effects are a developmental problem in tennis: but not necessarily when you’re left‐handed!},
  author={Florian Loffing and J. Schorer and S. Cobley},
  journal={High Ability Studies},
  year={2010},
  volume={21},
  pages={19 - 25}
}
Relative Age Effects (RAEs), describing attainment inequalities as a result of interactions between biological age and age‐grouping procedures, have been demonstrated across many sports contexts. This study examined whether an additional individual characteristic (i.e., handedness) mediated RAEs in tennis. Relative age and handedness distributions of 1027 male professional tennis players ranked in the year‐end ATP Top 500 for 2000–2006 were analyzed. Relatively older players, born in the first… Expand
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