Relationship of visual and olfactory signal parameters in a food-deceptive flower mimicry system

@article{Galizia2005RelationshipOV,
  title={Relationship of visual and olfactory signal parameters in a food-deceptive flower mimicry system},
  author={C. Giovanni Galizia and Jan Kunze and Andreas Gumbert and Anna-Karin Borg-Karlson and Silke Sachse and Christian Markl and Randolf Menzel},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology},
  year={2005},
  volume={16},
  pages={159-168}
}
Pollinators such as bees are attracted to flowers by their visual display and their scent. Although most flowers reinforce visits by providing pollen and/or nectar, there are species—notably from the orchid family—that do not but do resemble rewarding species. These mimicry relationships provide ideal opportunities for investigating the evolution of floral signals and their impact on pollinator behavior. Here, we have reanalyzed a case of specialized food mimicry between the orchid Orchis… 

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On the success of a swindle: pollination by deception in orchids
  • F. Schiestl
  • Environmental Science, Biology
    Naturwissenschaften
  • 2005
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Concepts of pollination by deception, and in particular recent findings in the pollination syndromes of food deception and sexual deception in orchids, are reviewed.
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