Relationship of Early Life Stress and Psychological Functioning to Adult C-Reactive Protein in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study

@article{Taylor2006RelationshipOE,
  title={Relationship of Early Life Stress and Psychological Functioning to Adult C-Reactive Protein in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study},
  author={Shelley E. Taylor and Barbara J Lehman and Catarina I. Kiefe and Teresa Seeman},
  journal={Biological Psychiatry},
  year={2006},
  volume={60},
  pages={819-824}
}
BACKGROUND Low socioeconomic status (SES) and a harsh family environment in childhood have been linked to mental and physical health disorders in adulthood. The objective of the present investigation was to evaluate a developmental model of pathways that may help explain these links and to relate them to C-reactive protein (CRP) in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) dataset. METHODS Participants (n = 3248) in the CARDIA study, age 32 to 47 years, completed measures… 
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