Relationship between the position preference and nutritional state of individuals in schools of juvenile roach (Rutilus rutilus)

@article{Krause2004RelationshipBT,
  title={Relationship between the position preference and nutritional state of individuals in schools of juvenile roach (Rutilus rutilus)},
  author={Jens Krause and Dirk Bumann and Dietmar Todt},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={30},
  pages={177-180}
}
SummaryPosition preferences of well-fed and food-deprived juvenile roach were investigated in schools of 2 and 4 fish in the laboratory. Food-deprived fish appeared significantly more often in the front position than their well-fed conspecifics. For fish at the same hunger level, individuals at the front of the school had the highest feeding rate. These results represent the first evidence for a relationship between the nutritional state of individual fish and their positions in a school and… 
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