Relationship between odor intensity estimates and COVID-19 population prediction in a Swedish sample

@article{Iravani2020RelationshipBO,
  title={Relationship between odor intensity estimates and COVID-19 population prediction in a Swedish sample},
  author={Behzad Iravani and Artin Arshamian and Aharon Ravia and Eva Mishor and Kobi Snitz and Sagit Shushan and Yehudah Roth and Ofer Perl and Danielle Honigstein and Reut Weissgross and Shiri Karagach and Gernot Ernst and Masako Okamoto and Zachary F. Mainen and Erminio Monteleone and Caterina Dinnella and Sara Spinelli and Franklin Mari{\~n}o‐S{\'a}nchez and Camille Ferdenzi and Monique A.M. Smeets and Kazushige Touhara and Moustafa Bensafi and Thomas Hummel and Noam Sobel and Johan Lundstrom},
  journal={medRxiv},
  year={2020}
}
In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, countries have implemented various strategies to reduce and slow the spread of the disease in the general population. For countries that have implemented restrictions on its population in a step-wise manner, monitoring of COVID-19 prevalence is of importance to guide decision on when to impose new, or when to abolish old, restrictions. We are here determining whether measures of odor intensity in a large sample can serve as one such measure. Online measures… 
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